Setting up the Arduino-IDE for the Bluefruit Feather in Ubuntu

arduino1.8.5

There are a lot of neat tools available to program/hack/reprogram/work with this nifty little Bluefruit Feather board! One of them is the Arduino-IDE, a development environment that allows you create and then flash your new programs to the board. I was faithfully following along in the Bluefruit Feather Arduino setup instructions, which are here:

https://learn.adafruit.com/bluefruit-nrf52-feather-learning-guide/arduino-bsp-setup

But I ran into an issue right out of the gate with step #1: Install the Arduino-IDE. In the instructions it states that it must be version 1.6.12+, something that I missed the first go around. Using Ubuntu’s regular package manager, I just used apt-get install to download  and install the Arduino-IDE.

When I moved on to the next step, where you are to put in the “Additional Board Manager URL”, I ran into a snag. There was no place to do that. The block that should have been displayed there in the preferences didn’t exist. So I re-read the instructions. Turns out that the Ubuntu repository only has Arduino-IDE version 1.0.5! So it was a little out of date.

Fortunately, on the bsp setup page above, there was a direct link to download and install the newer version of the software. A quick download, unzip/untar, and a quick $ sh ./install.sh command allowed me to install the latest version in minutes. Hopefully you can avoid that same pitfall. Now, back to those instructions….

Linux – keep it simple.

Geany: the little IDE that could!

geany_ide.png

Recently, while working with some older equipment, I needed a lightweight java IDE to compile some java projects. I really wasn’t looking for something quite as big as eclipse or netbeans, I just wanted a simple, one stop solution that would allow me to build java programs on an older laptop.

So, I rubbed a magic lamp, and out popped Geany!

Well, more specifically, the laptop is running Debian Wheezy, and had openJDK already installed. With that alone, I could have built java programs from the command line, but it can get a little tedious. So, I looked on the repositories for an IDE that wasn’t too large.

Thus enter Geany. I first used Geany a long time ago as a text editor on #! (CrunchBang) Linux, but revisiting the program revealed that I was not using it to it’s full potential. Specifically, you can compile, build, and run various program types from within Geany. Of course, it only outsources the commands for you, so you need a java jdk in order to compile java, or a c++ compiler to compile c++. Geany just does all the command line work for you.

What Geany does accomplish for you, however, is a great user interface with templates and the ability to organize projects or view code with different filters. As you can see in the picture, I was testing out Logic Crazy’s Alpha Beta Chess program.

As well as showing you the code, it can do parenthesis highlighting, colors for different code type, and a class and method tree on the side. It really is a great program if you need a lightweight IDE. I know that I’ll be putting it to good use.

Linux – keep it simple.

Take out the papers and the trash….

Every now and then I do something that I shouldn’t. Okay, probably more often than that. Either way, I really shouldn’t open up a file explorer as root, and I REALLY shouldn’t “delete” stuff while in an open file explorer as root. The reason that you shouldn’t do that is because file explorers don’t actually “delete” things. They put them in the trash. This gets doubly complicated when you use sudo to open your file explorer, because then the root “trash” ends up in your home trash.

That’s really annoying because when you right click the trash can and choose “empty”, you get an ugly pop up window explaining why you don’t have permission to empty your own garbage.

What’s worse, if you sudo open your file explorer again, you can’t get to the trash, because it is not a “real place”. Opening trash:/// in your file explorer just brings up more ugly pop up windows.

Fortunately, the answer is easy.

$ cd ~/.local/share/Trash/

Now you are in your trash can. If you look into your ./files/ folder, you will see the culprits. So, the simple thing to do is:

$ sudo chown -Rv <yourusername>:<yourusername> ./files/

or sudo chown -Rv alaskalinuxuser:alaskalinuxuser ./files/ in my case.

Now all the files in your trash can have been modified to be yours. Yes, now it is your mess to clean up, and to take out the trash you can once again right click on the trash can and say “empty”.

Linux – keep it simple.