Breaking down a gif file into frames

I was having a bit of fun with Gimp and put together this new boot animation for Liquid Smooth.

The principle thing that I did was create a template that was black with the Liquid Smooth logo cut out. Then I grabbed a raindrop gif that was freely available online. I then used this command to break it down from a gif into the various frames:

$ convert raindrops.gif 100.png

This created a file named 100-*.png for each frame (100-1.png, 100-2.png, etc.). ImageMagic is a very neat program, and if you are a Linux user, I suggest you apt-get/yum it. It works marvels! After breaking down the gif, I placed each frame behind the cutout I made earlier, and created each frame for my boot animation. Feel free to download it and check it out!

Download Link: http://www.mediafire.com/download/0n5zsxarxbk6b3b/akls6.zip

Linux – keep it simple.

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New SlimRoms Boot Animation

Just another simple SlimRoms boot animation. I use Gimp to make each frame, and then zip them together like so:

$ zip -r -0 ./SlimHD.zip ./part0
$ zip -r -0 ./SlimHD.zip ./part1
$ zip -r -0 ./SlimHD.zip ./desc.txt

Where -r means recursive, and -0 means no compression.

Download the Zip file:
http://www.mediafire.com/download/5kq2rn7ny1epmi7/SlimHD.zip

Animated GIF:

The desc.txt file is very straightforward, it simply says:

[CODE]
1080 1920 30
p 1 0 part0
p 0 0 part1

[/CODE]

1080 1920 – The screen resolution.

30 – Frames per second.

p 1 0 – Play this section, and stop after once.

p 0 0 – Play this section, and stop after none, which causes a loop of this folder.

If you unzip the file, you will see two folders, part0 and part1, with each frame in it, sequentially numbered 1000.jpg, 1001.jpg, etc. You will also see the desc.txt file. These boot animation files are really simple. It is the artwork that is the hard part. Personally, I don’t think art is my God given talent, but as long as he gives me the time to do it, I’m still learning how to make things that are fun and look good.

The ascii art was made by someone in the SlimRoms team, I didn’t make that one. I simply used Gimp to edit it, swirl it, pinch it, and color it.

Linux – Keep it simple.

SlimRoms Boot Animation

So while I was waiting for my homemade SlimRoms to compile, I used my time to put together this boot animation.

Download link:
http://www.mediafire.com/download/yrommhqq68j5dy2/slimrom.zip

It’s very, well, slim. Kind of keeps with the overall tone of Slimroms, I think.

I used gimp to create each frame, and then zipped them together with no compression. You are welcome to break down the zip if you would like to see the setup. Pretty simple really. While I am using it on my SGH-M919, with a 1080×1920 screen, the resolution of this animation is actually 480×800. Your phone should automatically center it on your screen, and in this case, undersizing it helps make it look even slimmer.

Be sure to rename it bootanimation.zip and drop it in your /system/media/ folder if you want to use it on your phone.

Linux – Keep it simple.

OmniRom boot animation

Boot animations are the logo, picture, or movie that plays as your Android phone boots up.

Here is a simple boot animation that I made for OmniRom. It has an old school 1985 feel to it.

It is 1080×1920 resolution.

Be sure to rename it bootanimation.zip and put it in /system/media in place of the original file. You can rename the original to bootanimation.bak, if you want to save it for later.

External download link:
http://www.mediafire.com/download/17…/omniamped.zip

And a link to the animated gif, if you want to preview it on your computer:
http://www.mediafire.com/view/36kgdr…/omniamped.gif

Linux – Keep it simple.